:: Volume 8, Issue 3 (10-2021) ::
3 2021, 8(3): 41-46 Back to browse issues page
The effect of nitrate compounds, nitrate and ammonium different stages of aquatic life
Abstract:   (125 Views)
Open pollution compounds such as nitrate, nitrite and ammonium acute or semi-acute water poisoning, especially juveniles’ fish create a short-term and long-term depending on the concentration impairs physiological activities and cause of death is unknown. Most affected by the contamination of farmed fish, their immune system is compromised. The main toxic reactions due to the conversion of nitrates in the water carry oxygen to the forms that are not capable of carrying oxygen. Nitrate toxicity on aquatic animals by increasing the concentration and exposure time increases. In contrast, nitrate toxicity may be associated with increasing body size, increase in water salinity, and reduced environmental sustainability. Fresh water animals seem to be more sensitive to nitrate is marine animals. Nitrate concentrations around 10 mg (maximum for drinking water according to Federal America) can have negative effects, at least in the long term exposure, freshwater invertebrates, fish and amphibians influence. Safe area under the concentration of nitrate to protect freshwater animals susceptible to nitrate contamination is recommended. In addition, the maximum level of 2 mg to protect the most sensitive freshwater species would be appropriate. In the case of marine animals, the maximum level of 20 mg is generally acceptable. However, in the early developmental stages of some marine invertebrates that have adapted well to the low nitrate concentration, may be more susceptible to nitrate are sensitive to freshwater invertebrates. 
Keywords: Water pollution, Mortality, Toxicity, Fish, Amphibians
Full-Text [PDF 645 kb]   (50 Downloads)    
Type of Study: Research | Subject: Special
Received: 2021/09/11 | Accepted: 2021/10/2 | Published: 2021/10/2


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Volume 8, Issue 3 (10-2021) Back to browse issues page